Razorback Food Recovery

Volunteer Applications Now Open!

Razorback Food Recovery Program

Food Recovery Volunteers will work a 1-hour shift to recover leftover food at a campus dining facility. Distribution Leaders will work a 1 1/2-hour shift to deliver the recovered food to partner sites around Northwest Arkansas. Both volunteer positions are once per week for the duration of the semester. Responsibilities for food recovery include preparing, packaging, data-logging, etc. recovered food in various locations across campus. Responsibilities for distribution include driving a University vehicle to transport recovered food from various locations on campus to local community partners. 

Recovery Leader:  Food Recovery Leaders will work a 1-hour shift where they take responsibility as shift leaders. Along with working their weekly shift, Recovery Leaders will meet every other week for the duration of the semester. Responsibilities include preparing, packaging, data-logging, etc. recovered food in various locations across campus. 

 

What is Food Recovery?

Razorback Food Recovery Group Pic

It is estimated that colleges throw away 22 millions pounds of extra food every year. The purpose of Food Recovery is to recover this extra, wholesome food that would otherwise be wasted and donate it to hungry people. Razorback Food Recovery volunteers work with Chartwells Dining Service employees to recover the surplus food on a daily basis.

In the first phase of RFR, beginning in February 2014, volunteers recover food from retail locations in the Arkansas Union. Chartwells employees take the pre-packaged or bakery items to a designated location in the Union that holds a refrigerator for RFR to use. Each morning, volunteers go to the location to weigh and log the food and from there it is delivered to be donated either to Full Circle Campus Pantry or another community partner.

In the second phase of RFR, beginning in October 2014, volunteers recover food from Pomfret Dining Hall. In this process, volunteers recover food between lunch and dinner. Volunteers separate the large pans of surplus food into individual, freezable meals that can then be given out to community partner agencies. 


 

In the News

  Person holding food

U of A Students Working to Ensure Food Isn't Wasted During Walmart Week

Photo by Matt Reynolds

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. – It’s a fact of the food service industry that not every meal that’s prepared gets served and eaten.

Chartwells, which provides food service for the University of Arkansas, is in the process of preparing about 72,000 meals this week for the activities leading up to – and including – the Walmart Shareholder’s meeting on campus Friday, June 5. Walmart associates, staff, executives, shareholders and guests will be served breakfast, lunch and dinner each day, and Chartwells will also provide food for several special events.

There will be leftovers.

That doesn’t mean they will go to waste.

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  Person holding food

Razorback Food Recovery Feeds Community

By Bob Whitby
University Staff Writer
Photo by Russell Cothren

Did you know that about one-third of all the food produced in the United States goes to waste?

Food insecurity — the academic term for not having enough to eat on a regular basis — affects more than 14 percent of American households.
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